Stay At Home Tuesday: The Faculty Security Issue Under Proposed ABA Standards, Last Year’s Library Stories, History For Sale, and Apple

Another frigid day with spotty train service means another day browsing the legal news and commentary.  There are several stories worth reading.  The first is the National Law Journal’s report about the AALS panel discussion on the ABA’s proposed standards.  Naturally, the standard eliminating tenure as a requirement for accreditation got significant discussion.  Faculty members on the panel as well as those in the audience were overwhelmingly against the proposal.  Their argument was that removing tenure would weaken academic freedom, among other negative outcomes.  This position is reflected in the published comments (scroll down to Terms and Conditions of Employment) to the draft of Standard 405 at the ABA web site.

The proposal was explained by Saint Louis University Professor Jeffry Lewis and ABA committee chair revising the accreditation standards.  He noted the text contains several options for job security and protection of academic freedom that can replace tenure.  The proposed ABA standards would require schools to have job restrictions in place that would attract competent faculty by having effective rules that provide provide job security and protect academic freedom.  The draft options and interpretations of the proposed standards are here

I wonder just how far schools will go in defining the faculty relationship if this is approved.  It will be pretty interesting to see what the employment contract’s terms sans tenure will be for new professors.  Will they be largely standardized or will they be negotiated individually?  How will publication reflect advancement?  Really, it could be the world turned upside down if this is approved.      

Publishers Weekly has a review of the top 10 library stories of 2013.  The items include the decision in the Google book scanning case, somewhat more liberal terms for libraries to lend e-books, and the emergence of the Digital Public Library of America.  The story nicely sums up the legal and technological issues affecting libraries in the last year.

Wandering over to the New Yorker finds two stories of interest.  One details the dismemberment of antiquarian books to sell parts to collectors through various exchanges, including eBay.  Everything is for sale these days.  Historical objects are obviously no exception.  The other story concerns the fight Apple is having with the court appointed compliance monitor over his rate (Apple is footing the bill, and it is large) and the level of access to executives and board members.  Apple filed objections in Court over the issues.  The story details the background to this particular aspect of the case.

Getting back to the tenure issue for a moment, I was reminded of the Pretenders’ song Brass In Pocket.  Or should the musical moment be Back On The Chain Gang?

Mark

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