Short Takes On The News: “Exceptional” Lawsuits, Denial of a Law License, and Law School Accreditation

Boy, I haven’t done one of these in quite some time.  Wandering down the Internet news can bring up some mighty unusual items where the law gets involved.  Take, for example, this story in Wonkette about one Sylvia Driskell from Auburn, Nebraska.  She has filed a handwritten complaint in the federal court for the District of Nebraska against all homosexuals on behalf of God and his Son, Jesus Christ.  The complaint alleges “sin.”

I expect the suit will be dismissed for any number of reasons including the inability to provide an address for service much like this earlier case from Nebraska where a state senator sued God to comment on the ability of court access by the public.  There is also the question of jurisdiction, to wit which federal law or rule can the plaintiff invoke that gets the case properly before the Court.

I’ve worked with a lot of public patrons/pro se litigants over the years.  They have ranged from, in my opinion, fairly competent to having no grasp on reality in regard to what is a justiciable issue.  I feel for the librarians, if any, who had to discuss the case with Driskell pre-filing.

In a somewhat related story, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court denied a law license to one Randy Britton for a variety of reasons.  One is that he used a letter of recommendation that was part of a settlement agreement in a civil suit against the lawyer who wrote it.  The lawyer filed a criminal complaint against Britton which was later dismissed.  The letter was part of related civil actions.  The Court also found Britton failed to disclose other cases including one where he sued over a denial of a license for assault weapons.  He also had a “substantial history of initiating pro se legal actions, the majority of which have been unsuccessful, and some of which have resulted in sanctions or an order to pay restitution.”  Read more at the ABA Journal.

Finally, the new Indiana Tech Law School in Fort Wayne, Indiana, has not received accreditation in its second year of operation.  I’ve written before about the school, most of it wondering why it exists in the current academic climate.  If I remember correctly, it had to do with that part of Indiana being an underserved market with potential applicants going off to Michigan and Ohio for an education.  The story in the Fort Wayne News-Sentinel quotes school representatives as saying the school will make improvements to the program once it receives the inspection report.  Well, good luck to that.

Mark

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