Artificial intelligence and legal research instruction

Jamie J. Baker’s 2017 A Legal Research Odyssey: Artificial Intelligence as Disruptor discusses the current state of artificial intelligence as it applies to law. The article provides a background in current technological capabilities, shows how these capabilities are being used in various professions, including finance and medicine, and provides an overview of current natural language processing capabilities to discuss how the latest technological advances will realistically be applied to legal research. The article ultimately argues that law librarians must still infuse law students with sound legal research process and understanding so that they have the ability to confidently rely on algorithms in the face of various ethical duties. Here’s the abstract:

Cognitive computing is revolutionizing finance through the ability to combine structured and unstructured data and provide precise market analysis. It is also revolutionizing medicine by providing well-informed options for diagnoses. Analogously, ROSS, a progeny of IBM’s Watson, is set to revolutionize the legal field by bringing cognitive computing to legal research. While ROSS is currently being touted as possessing the requisite sophistication to perform effortless legal research, there is a real danger in a technology like ROSS causing premature disruption. As in medicine and finance, cognitive computing has the power to make legal research more efficient. But the technology is not ready to replace the need for law students to learn sound legal research process and strategy. When done properly, legal research is a highly creative skill that requires a deep level of analysis. Law librarians must infuse law students with an understanding of legal research process, as well as instruct on the practical aspects of using artificial intelligence responsibly in the face of algorithmic transparency, the duty of technology competence, malpractice pitfalls, and the unauthorized practice of law.

— Joe

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