What are deepfakes?

“Deepfakes” is an artificial intelligence-based human image synthesis technique. It is used to combine and superimpose existing images and videos onto source images or videos, usually without permission. Such digital impersonation is on the rise. Deepfakes raise the stakes for the “fake news” phenomenon in dramatic fashion (quite literally). Lawfare offers examples:

  • Fake videos could feature public officials taking bribes, uttering racial epithets, or engaging in adultery.
  • Politicians and other government officials could appear in locations where they were not, saying or doing horrific things that they did not.
  • Fake videos could place them in meetings with spies or criminals, launching public outrage, criminal investigations, or both.
  • Soldiers could be shown murdering innocent civilians in a war zone, precipitating waves of violence and even strategic harms to a war effort.
  • A deep fake might falsely depict a white police officer shooting an unarmed black man while shouting racial epithets.
  • A fake audio clip might “reveal” criminal behavior by a candidate on the eve of an election.
  • A fake video might portray an Israeli official doing or saying something so inflammatory as to cause riots in neighboring countries, potentially disrupting diplomatic ties or even motivating a wave of violence.
  • False audio might convincingly depict U.S. officials privately “admitting” a plan to commit this or that outrage overseas, exquisitely timed to disrupt an important diplomatic initiative.
  • A fake video might depict emergency officials “announcing” an impending missile strike on Los Angeles or an emergent pandemic in New York, provoking panic and worse.

For more, see:

The impending war over deepfakes, Axios, July 22, 2018

Here’s why it’s so hard to spot deepfakes, CNN, Aug. 8, 2018

Deep Fakes: A Looming Crisis for National Security, Democracy and Privacy?, Lawfare, Feb. 21, 2018

— Joe

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