Trust but (try to) Validate Applied AI Output

Trust is a state of readiness to take a risk in a relationship. Once upon a time most law librarians were predisposed to trust legal information vendors and their products and services. Think Shepard’s in print when Shepard’s was the only available citator with signals that were by default the industry standard. Think late 1970s-early 1980s for computer-assisted legal research where the degree of risk taken by a searcher was partially controlled by properly using Boolean operators when Lexis was the only full-text legal search vendor.

Today, output from legal information platforms does not always result in building confidence around the use of the information provided be it legal search or legal citator outputs as comparative studies of each by Mart and Hellyer have demonstrated. What about the output we are now being offered by way of the implementation of artificial intelligence for legal analytics and predictive technology? As legal information professionals are we willing to be vulnerable to the actions of our vendors based on some sort of expectation that vendors will provide actionable intelligence important to our user population, irrespective of our ability to monitor or control vendors’ use of artificial intelligence for legal analytics and predictive technology?

Hopefully we are not so naive as to trust our vendors applied AI output at face value. But we won’t be given the opportunity to shine a light into the “black box” because of understandable proprietary concerns. What’s needed is a way to identify the impact of model error and bias. One way is to compare similar legal analytic outputs that identify trends and patterns using data points from past case law, win/loss rates and even a judge’s history or similar predictive technology outputs that forecast litigation outcome like Mart did for legal search and Hellyer did for citators. At the present time, however, our legal information providers do not offer similar enough AI tools for comparative studies and who knows if they will.  Early days… .

Until such time as there is a legitimate certification process to validate each individual AI product to the end user when the end user calls up specific applied AI output for legal analytics and predictive technology, is there any reason to assume the risk of using them? No, not really, but use them our end users will. Trust but (try to) validate otherwise the output remains opaque to the end user and that can lead to illusions of understanding.

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