According to this Pew study, when the 116th Congress convenes in January, at least 26 House members will be Millennials (i.e., born between 1981 and 1996), up from only five at the start of the current Congress in January 2017 and six just before the Nov. 6 midterms. More than a fifth (20) of the 91 freshmen members-elect are Millennials, and 14 of those 20 are Democrats – including Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, at 29 the youngest woman ever elected to Congress.

Through the prism of the real estate market and homeownership in black neighborhoods, this Brookings Institution report attempts to address the question: What is the cost of racial bias? This report seeks to understand how much money majority-black communities are losing in the housing market stemming from racial bias, finding that owner-occupied homes in black neighborhoods are undervalued by $48,000 per home on average, amounting to $156 billion in cumulative losses.

This Law Library of Congress report contains data on 131 countries, indicating whether or not published books are subject to a mandatory deposit requirement at the national level and, if so, how many copies are required, where they must be deposited, and whether the deposit is part of the copyright system. Citations to the controlling legislation for mandatory deposits are provided. In all but thirteen of the jurisdictions surveyed, deposits are required. For some of these thirteen jurisdictions, deposits are voluntary, while in others, no information regarding deposit practices could be found.

Who Can Serve as Acting Attorney General (LSB10217, Nov. 15, 2018) discusses the two primary arguments raised to challenge the President’s decision to name Whitaker as Acting AG: first, that the Vacancies Act does not apply because another statute, 28 U.S.C. §508, provides that the Deputy Attorney General (DAG) serves as Acting AG in the event of a vacancy and second, that the Appointments Clause prohibits Whitaker, a non-Senate-confirmed official, from serving as the head of the DOJ.

Last summer complaints were circulating that LexisNexis was jacking up shipping charges again, at least for some titles. Well, here’s another reason for watching your LexisNexis print invoices. Reports on law-lib indicate that LexisNexis is now automatically charging $2 for a paper invoice for Lexis Advance, is not itemizing this surcharge, and hence has (unlawfully?) unilaterally increased contractually specified Lexis Advance charges. Talk about nickel-and-diming your install base. Just how desperate is LexisNexis?

Electing the Speaker of the House of Representatives: Frequently Asked Questions (R44243, Nov. 26, 2018) briefly poses and answers several “frequently asked questions” in relation to the floor proceedings used to elect a Speaker of the House. Current practice for electing a Speaker, either at the start of a Congress or in the event of a vacancy (e.g., death or resignation), is by roll-call vote, during which Members state aloud the name of their preferred candidate. Members may vote for any individual. If no candidate receives a majority of votes cast, balloting continues; in subsequent ballots, Members may still vote for any individual. See also Speakers of the House: Elections, 1913-2017 (RL 30857, Nov. 26, 2018).

The Center for Digital Government announced the results of its 2018 Digital States Survey, a biennial evaluation of the technology practices of all 50 states, last month. The Digital States Survey evaluates states’ use of technology to improve service delivery, increase capacity, streamline operations and reach policy goals and assigns each state a grade based on quantifiable results. Since the last biennial survey in 2016, grades improved in 17 states, declined in 6 and stayed the same in 27. Michigan, Missouri, Ohio and Utah maintained their A grade and Georgia moved up to A designation.

Meet the Freshmen: A Guide to the New House Members of the 116th Congress provides a broad overview of the positions that incoming members of the US House of Representatives have taken on campaign finance and ethics reform, infrastructure, healthcare, immigration, taxes, trade, and party leadership. This guide uses publicly available sources –- including statements from each candidate’s campaign websites, candidate questionnaires, social media reports, debates, interviews, and news reports -– to provide a broad overview of where the freshmen representatives stand on these issues.

H/T to beSpacific.

From the blurb for David Priess, How to Get Rid of a President: History’s Guide to Removing Unpopular, Unable, or Unfit Chief Executives (PublicAffairs, Nov. 13, 2018):

To limit executive power, the founding fathers created fixed presidential terms of four years, giving voters regular opportunities to remove their leaders. Even so, Americans have often resorted to more dramatic paths to disempower the chief executive. The American presidency has seen it all, from rejecting a sitting president’s renomination bid and undermining their authority in office to the more drastic methods of impeachment, and, most brutal of all, assassination.

How to Get Rid of a President showcases the political dark arts in action: a stew of election dramas, national tragedies, and presidential departures mixed with party intrigue, personal betrayal, and backroom shenanigans. This briskly paced, darkly humorous voyage proves that while the pomp and circumstance of presidential elections might draw more attention, the way that presidents are removed teaches us much more about our political order.