It’s not too late 1Ls.  – Joe

Produced by Bloomberg Law:

Large tuition bills, huge debt loads and lousy job prospects — with all that facing today’s law students, who could blame them for considering dropping out of school? For some students, that’s the first step on a path to finding their true calling, as it was for the famous law school dropouts featured in this video.

Kudos to ABAJ for finally recognizing CALI’s John Mayer as a member of ABA Journal’s class of 2013 Legal Rebels. It’s about time IMHO. This is the fifth annual Legal Rebels installment and John has been doing his CALI thing since 1994. No doubt John was happy to accept the recognition on behalf of CALI’s staff, past and present, and the Center’s institutional supporters. In the below ABAJ video he promotes one of CALI’s most important projects, A2J.

John’s CALI gig almost lasted no longer than a concert performance by the other John Mayer.  According to the ABAJ’s profile (located under the heading “Freeing the Law” here), “Shortly after starting, center leaders told him the organization might shut down.” I wonder what bar on the west side of the Loop John went to after hearing that!

Oh, BTW, John is a member of the inaugural class of the Fastcase 50. The 2011 Fastcase 50 profile does a far better job at capturing the essence of this rebel with a damn good cause. For example, “John Mayer is a visionary and a connector (as well as a leading purveyor of flying stuffed animals at conferences).”

Joe

Serving as editors, Sue Polanka and Mirela Roncevic have issued a call for article proposals for ALA’s new eContent Quarterly. From the No Shelf Required post:

eContent Quarterly is now accepting proposals for contributions to its Spring 2014 issue. Librarians, publishers, vendors, and other information science professionals interested in writing an article about how their institution is braving an e-content challenge, or if they are in the midst of developing or releasing a product librarians and information professionals should know about, may send their proposal to the editors (sue.polanka@wright.edu; mirela@mirelaroncevic.com), including a detailed description of the topic and information about affiliation and credentials.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Effect of digital content on learning and literacy
  • Discoverability and marketing of digital content
  • Business model experimentation
  • Ebook platform technologies
  • Locally-hosted digital content
  • Library as Publisher
  • Self-publishing and libraries
  • Budgeting for digital content
  • Impact of one-to-one device adoption
  • Open access ebooks
  • Digital textbook adoption

For the latest information, see eContent Quarterly ready for launch; contributors for future issues wanted. To subscribe to eContent Quarterly visit this page.

Joe

Due to the temporary shutdown of the federal government,  the Library of Congress is closed to the public and researchers beginning October 1, 2013 until further notice.

All public events are cancelled and web sites are inaccessible  except the legislative information sites THOMAS.gov and beta.congress.gov

Source: Library of Congress Shutdown Message

See beSpacific’s Government Websites that are offline – the list will be expanded.  Joe

Since DLA Piper and Jones Day, we haven’t seen any announcements about BLaw signing up entire BigLaw firm staffs in the news. Perhaps I missed them. However, I’m sure there are plenty of BigLaw firms licensing BLaw under limited seat agreements. No doubt BLaw is putting the squeeze on WEXIS. So is Fastcase.

The New York State Bar Association, the largest voluntary state bar association in the country, is now offering Fastcase to its 76,000 members. Quoting from the Sept. 25, 2013 press release:

This is the new normal, when New York firms are absorbing their legal research costs as overhead, and firms of all sizes are looking to add a nonbillable ‘house account’ for legal research,” said Fastcase President Phil Rosenthal. “This partnership makes the NYSBA and Fastcase a better value than ever for New York firms, because they can reduce the costs of legal research and they can do so with the world’s smartest legal research tools.”

The Fastcase-NYSBA agreement pushes Fastcase’s user population over the 600,000 mark. Unlike Casemaker, Fastcase’s adoption rate extends well beyond the state bar association market.

Joe

A seven-month investigation by KrebsOnSecurity revealed that more than 1,300 customers of SSNDOB, an ID theft service, spent hundreds of thousands of dollars looking up SSNs, birthdates, and driver license records and unauthorized credit and background reports obtained by hacking into LexisNexis, D&B and other major data brokers. The finding is based on a copy of the SSNDOB database that became available after the ID theft service was itself hacked.

According to the SSNDOB’s online dashboard, the hackers had access to LN’s internal networks as far back as April 10, 2013 and D&B’s at least as far back as March 27, 2013. For details, see KrebsOnSecurity’s Data Broker Giants Hacked by ID Theft Service. See also Dan Goodin’s How LexisNexis and others may have unwittingly aided identity thieves (Ars Technica).

Joe

OASIS members are discussing the feasibility of designing an open standard data model and markup model for legal citations that can be used in electronic texts.The importance of addressing this issue should be obvious to legal information professionals. See Draft Proposal for a New OASIS Technical Committee (Legalcite) which is accompanied by a backgrounder.

Quoting from an email by Chet Ensign, Director of Standards Development and TC Administration, OASIS Open:

A standard model for tagging citations could simplify software development and become the foundation for new innovations in legal authoring, linking, annotating, searching, and citation analysis, all without requiring that the display text on the page be changed in any way.

If this is of interest to you, your organization, or any of your colleagues, we would be pleased to hear from you. Feedback — supportive, skeptical or critical — is key to launching an effort with the right scope to deliver an open standard that the legal field can use. If you are interested in learning more about how you can participate in the effort, we would like to hear from you as well.

See Chet’s web profile to contact him directly. Thanks for the heads-up.

Joe

In Link Rot within SCOTUS Opinions and Law Reviews [SSRN], Jonathan Zittrain and Kendra Albert found that 49% of URLs in surveyed SCOTUS opinions no long send the reader to the cited web source. Raizel Liebler and June Liebert’s recently published article, Something Rotten in the State of Legal Citation: The Life Span of a United States Supreme Court Citation Containing an Internet Link (1996-2010), 15 YALE J.L. & TECH. 273 (2013), reports a SCOTUS link rot rate of 29%. Obviously there’s a problem. But it is not with the difference in survey findings. Clearly SCOTUS must get its act together by linking to a self-hosted openly accessible archive of the web content that was cited and currently only stored in the Court’s files. How about naming the archive “Last Visited On”?

Zittrain and Albert’s article is recommended but I found Liebler and Lieber’s much more informative. Here’s the abstract for Something Rotten in the State of Legal Citation: The Life Span of a United States Supreme Court Citation Containing an Internet Link (1996-2010):

Citations are the cornerstone upon which judicial opinions and law review articles stand. Within this context, citations provide for both authorial verification of the original source material at the moment they are used and the needed information for later readers to find the cited source. The ability to check citations and verify that citations to the original sources are accurate is integral to ensuring accurate characterizations of sources and determining where a researcher received information. However, accurate citations do not always mean that a future researcher will be able to find the exact same information as the original researcher. Citations to disappearing websites cause serious problems for future legal researchers. Our present mode of citing websites in judicial cases, including within U.S. Supreme Court cases, allows such citations to disappear, becoming inaccessible to future scholars. Without significant change, the information in citations within judicial opinions will be known solely from those citations. Citations to the U.S. Supreme Court are especially important of the Court’s position at the top of federal court hierarchy, determining the law of the land, and even influencing the law in international jurisdictions. Unfortunately and disturbingly, the Supreme Court appears to have a vast problem with link rot, the condition of internet links no longer working. We found that number of websites that are no longer working cited to by Supreme Court opinions is alarmingly high, almost one-third (29%). Our research in Supreme Court cases also found that the rate of disappearance is not affected by the type of online document (pdf, html, etc) or the sources of links (government or non-government) in terms of what links are now dead. We cannot predict what links will rot, even within Supreme Court cases.

Hat tip to Adam Liptak’s In Supreme Court Opinions, Web Links to Nowhere (NYT, Sept. 23, 2013).

Joe

Welcome to Law Librarians (thinking out loud in the Blogosphere) or LLB for short. If that sounds familiar it’s because Mark Giangrande and I have moved our blogging activities from old LLB to here. We will be writing on the same topics we did since old LLB was launched in 2005. Nothing has changed except the URL.

To all our friends who emailed us after noticing that we hadn’t been publishing, the answer to your question — “is everything OK?” — is yes. Thanks for your concern. We’re alive and kicking. Hope you stop by to read our posts here. LLB’s syndication widgets are located in the right sidebar.

Joe