ALA’s Virtual Town Hall on eBooks will explore emerging subjects in the eBook lending arena, including digital preservation, reader accessibility, self-publisher engagement, and libraries as publishers. It will take place from 11 a.m. to noon Central time on Wednesday, October 23, 2013.

Panelists include:

  • Barbara Stripling, ALA president;
  • Maureen Sullivan, ALA immediate past president;
  • Keith Michael Fiels, ALA executive director;
  • Sari Feldman, executive director of the Cuyahoga County Public Library and DCWG cochair;
  • Robert Wolven, associate university librarian of Columbia University and DCWG cochair;
  • Alan S. Inouye, director of ALA’s Office for Information Technology Policy.

Register here.

Joe

Starting at slide 11, Bess Reynolds, Technical Services Manager, Debevoise & Plimpton LLP, addresses pain points, budgetary concerns and the failure of vendors to develop library management tools, issues all law libraries, large and small in the private and public sectors, face in acquiring and maintaining today’s digital resources. From her Oct. 4, 2013 presentation at LLNE’s Fall Meeting, “Acquiring and Maintaining Resources for the New Collection” [complete stack below], pain points include:

  • Substituting digital formats for print without proper notice;
  • Digital versions of print serials that circulated to many may come with a prohibitively high single user price tag; and
  • Creating proprietary platforms for eBooks thwarting single silo for discovery

With respect to vendors failing to develop library management tools, Bess notes that busy lawyers don’t have time to register themselves on web sites, manage their passwords and learn new platforms. Internal IT department restrictions designed to protect an institution’s network results in attorneys and librarians not able to install applications or vendor plug-ins. And, of course, any new vendor software scheme requires extensive in-house testing.

It is “important for publishers to hear directly from their customers” because official AALL vendor relations dogma maintains that “we don’t all have the same needs and perspectives.” I believe Bess Reynolds’ presentation underscores that working law librarians are grappling with the same issues regardless of their institutional setting when it comes to acquiring and maintaining resources for the new normal in collection development. — Joe

Trial by Google: Judicial Notice in the Information Age [SSRN] “explores the emerging phenomenon of courts taking judicial notice of facts gleaned from Internet web sites, like Google Maps.  It highlights the inviting and terrifying intersection of venerable judicial notice doctrine and the Internet, and ultimately suggests guidelines for courts applying Federal Rule of Evidence 201 (Judicial Notice) and state analogues to Internet sources,” according to the article’s co-author, Jeffrey Bellin, on EvidenceProf Blog. Here’s the abstract for Bellin and Andrew Guthrie Ferguson’s forthcoming Northwestern University Law Review article:

This Article presents a theory of judicial notice for the information age. It argues that the ease of accessing factual data on the Internet allows judges and litigants to expand the use of judicial notice in ways that raise significant concerns about admissibility, reliability, and fair process. State and federal courts are already applying the surprisingly pliant judicial notice rules to bring websites ranging from Google Maps to Wikipedia into the courtroom, and these decisions will only increase in frequency in coming years. This rapidly emerging judicial phenomenon is notable for its ad hoc and conclusory nature – attributes that have the potential to undermine the integrity of the factfinding process. The theory proposed here, which is the first attempt to conceptualize judicial notice in the information age, remedies these potential failings by setting forth both an analytical framework for decision, as well as a process for how courts should memorialize rulings on the propriety of taking judicial notice of Internet sources to allow meaningful review.

Very interesting and highly recommended for legal research and writing instruction.  Joe

Serving as editors, Sue Polanka and Mirela Roncevic have issued a call for article proposals for ALA’s new eContent Quarterly. From the No Shelf Required post:

eContent Quarterly is now accepting proposals for contributions to its Spring 2014 issue. Librarians, publishers, vendors, and other information science professionals interested in writing an article about how their institution is braving an e-content challenge, or if they are in the midst of developing or releasing a product librarians and information professionals should know about, may send their proposal to the editors (sue.polanka@wright.edu; mirela@mirelaroncevic.com), including a detailed description of the topic and information about affiliation and credentials.

Topics of interest include but are not limited to:

  • Effect of digital content on learning and literacy
  • Discoverability and marketing of digital content
  • Business model experimentation
  • Ebook platform technologies
  • Locally-hosted digital content
  • Library as Publisher
  • Self-publishing and libraries
  • Budgeting for digital content
  • Impact of one-to-one device adoption
  • Open access ebooks
  • Digital textbook adoption

For the latest information, see eContent Quarterly ready for launch; contributors for future issues wanted. To subscribe to eContent Quarterly visit this page.

Joe

OASIS members are discussing the feasibility of designing an open standard data model and markup model for legal citations that can be used in electronic texts.The importance of addressing this issue should be obvious to legal information professionals. See Draft Proposal for a New OASIS Technical Committee (Legalcite) which is accompanied by a backgrounder.

Quoting from an email by Chet Ensign, Director of Standards Development and TC Administration, OASIS Open:

A standard model for tagging citations could simplify software development and become the foundation for new innovations in legal authoring, linking, annotating, searching, and citation analysis, all without requiring that the display text on the page be changed in any way.

If this is of interest to you, your organization, or any of your colleagues, we would be pleased to hear from you. Feedback — supportive, skeptical or critical — is key to launching an effort with the right scope to deliver an open standard that the legal field can use. If you are interested in learning more about how you can participate in the effort, we would like to hear from you as well.

See Chet’s web profile to contact him directly. Thanks for the heads-up.

Joe