Category Archives: News

‘Ex Libris – The New York Public Library’ trailer

From the film’s official synopsis: “The legendary filmmaker [Frederick Wiseman] brings his incisive vision behind the scenes of one of the world’s greatest institutions of learning, capturing the vast programmatic scope of NYC’s library system. The NYPL is blessed with uniformly passionate staff and deeply devoted, appreciative bibliophiles and beneficiaries across its 92 branches. The film reveals a venerable place of welcome, cultural exchange, and intellectual creativity.” — Joe

LexisNexis sells 150+ law enforcement titles to Blue360 Media

From the July 13, 2017 press release:

Blue360° Media has acquired over 150 law enforcement publications from LexisNexis® Group covering 40 U.S. states. Blue360° Media publishes Law Enforcement Manuals, Code Books, Field Guides, and an Officer Series focused on professional development.  With over 170,000 publications ordered each year, Blue360° Media helps new recruits learn the criminal and traffic laws for their jurisdiction, assists seasoned professionals in quickly finding legal changes, and helps department managers institute best practices with guidance on issues such as report writing and passing promotional exams.

“2017 has been a particularly active legislative year, and it is important that our officers remain up-to-date on the ever changing criminal code. At Blue360° we are passionate about serving our men and women in blue, and we seek to keep them safe and successful in protecting and serving in our communities,” said CEO Susan Slisz.

— Joe

Complaint available in the Fox News Seth Rich lawsuit

Headlines are blaring everywhere about the lawsuit filed by Rod Wheeler against Fox News involving a Fox story, later retracted, about the death of Seth Rich as part of a plan to distract from the Russia investigation involving President Trump.  See Lawsuit Asserts White House Role in Fox News Article on Seth Rich from the New York Times as an example.  If anyone is interested, the complaint in the case is available from the Deadline news site, here. Another source is from Document Cloud. —Mark

Dark web update: Someone is selling 40+ million voter records

For Mother Jones, A.J. Vicens reports that more than 40 million voter records from at least nine states are being offered for sale on a dark web forum, and the seller claims to have records for an additional 20 to 25 states, according to Dark Reading, a news organization focused on information security. See Someone is selling more than 40 million voter records on the dark web (July 26, 2017)

On a related dark web note, the DOJ announced last week “the seizure of the largest criminal marketplace on the Internet, AlphaBay, which operated for over two years on the dark web and was used to sell deadly illegal drugs, stolen and fraudulent identification documents and access devices, counterfeit goods, malware and other computer hacking tools, firearms, and toxic chemicals throughout the world.” DOJ July 20, 2017 press release.

— Joe

 

Friday Fun (with some sadness): Of Moose And Men

I was saddened on Thursday night to hear the news that June Foray had passed away at the age of 99.  She was a remarkable voice actor whose is most notably known for the voice of Rocket J. Squirrel from the Rocky and Bullwinkle show from the 60s.  There was nothing like it on TV at the time and it spawned any number of culturally subversive cartoons that followed.  Dare I say without Rocky and Bullwinkle we would not have Ren and Stimpy or Ralph Bakshi’s crazed version of Mighty Mouse.

Miss Foray reprised the voice of Rocky in the 2000 live action movie, The Adventures of Rocky and Bullwinkle, starring Robert Di Niro as Fearless Leader, Jason Alexander as Boris Badenov, and Rene Russo as Natahsa Fatale.  The movie was uneven but still a joy with the inspired cast list and cameos.  Other voices in Miss Foray’s repertoire include Granny and every other witch that appeared in Looney Toons cartoons.  Her voice was unmistakable.

OK, so much for the sadness.  On the fun side, please enjoy the 55 minute or so documentary Of Moose And Men, the story of the Rocky and Bullwinkle Show.

Thank you June for all of the joy you’ve given so many people in your long career.

–Mark

Fastcase announces 2017 Fastcase 50 award winners

Kudos to this year’s Fastcase 50 class. Here’s the list. — Joe

Fastcase appoints Steve Errick as Chief Operating Officer and announces plan to launch own imprint for secondary works

Yesterday Fastcase announced that former LexisNexis executive Steve Errick will join the company’s executive team on July 1 as Chief Operating Officer. He will be responsible for executing the company’s strategic vision, developing new editorial products, and developing the company’s organizational structure as the company expands. From the press release:

“We couldn’t be more excited to have Steve join the team,” said Fastcase CEO Ed Walters. “Fastcase is an increasingly complex company, with sophisticated legal data updating operations, multiple product lines and more than 100 employees in three offices – and we’re growing all the time. Steve’s deep relationships in the industry and his experience in managing legal publishing companies at scale will be important as we are becoming one of America’s largest legal tech companies.”

Fastcase also announced that it would begin editorial publishing starting in 2018 to expand the reach of its legal research service, which to date has focused exclusively on primary law such as case law, statutes, regulations, court rules, and constitutions. The company will launch it’s own imprint of expert treatises, secondary material, journals and partner with its various State Bar Associations in developing new state workflow products to serve the state practitioner markets.

“Early in my career at West, my challenge was finding the best authors,” Errick said. “Most recently at LexisNexis it was acquiring the best companies and building a product team to drive those businesses. And now, I get this wonderful opportunity to use these diverse experiences to help accelerate the pace of the most innovative company in legal tech.”

Sometime in the future, the hiring of Steve Errick will be viewed as the stimulus for taking Fastcase to the next level to compete with Thomson Reuters, LexisNexis and Bloomberg BNA. It is no coincidence that Fastcase’s press release announced both the hiring of Errick and the move into the secondary source market in 2018. — Joe

Hello I Must Be Going

I’ve been at DePaul since 1999 and in Law Libraries generally since I was a circulation assistant at the Chicago-Kent College of Law in 1976.  That’s been around 41 years in the biz.  That’s a long time no matter how one slices it.

I will be retiring from DePaul at the end of June.  I look forward to sitting on my couch with my cats while watching cartoons all day long.  I may even pop up here a little bit more because of all the free time I’ll have.  We’ll see.  I’d like to thank everyone I’ve worked with in the profession.  It’s been fun.

Mark

Obama’s presidential library and NARA’s new model for the preservation and accessibility of presidential records

The first images and models of Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects’ plans for the Obama Presidential Library in Chicago have been revealed. The proposal includes a tall stone-clad museum with faceted sides and cutaway corners, sat beside a lower forum and opposite a library. See image above. For more, go here.

The new presidential library will not hold print copies of Obama’s presidential papers. Instead the Obama Foundation plans to fund digitzing them with NARA storing the original materials offsite but available for lending according to NARA’s May 3, 2017 press release, National Archives Announces a New Model for the Preservation and Accessibility of Presidential Records.

H/T to Gary Price’s InfoDocket posts. — Joe

 

RIP Former ITLA president Robert Bigelow

A pioneer in the field of legal technology, Robert Bigelow died March 23rd at the age of 90. Check out Bob Ambrogi’s LawSites post for details. — Joe

LexBlog launches Fastcase integration

Law bloggers frequently cite to primary sources but most offer no links to them because the sources they use reside behind a paywall, be it Bloomberg, LexisNexis or Thomson Reuters. For LexBlog bloggers, the paywall problem has been resolved by the integration of Fastcase’s legal search service into LexBlog’s WordPress platform. Now clicking on a LexBlog link will display within the same browser interface primary law sourced by Fastcase. For details, see Kevin O’Keefe’s LexBlog launches Fastcase integration. — Joe

RIP Eugene Garfield, September 16, 1925 – February 26, 2017

Sad news to report. On February 26th, Eugene Garfield, a giant in the LIS field who founded the Institute for Scientific Information and The Scientist, passed away. Here’s the link to The Scientist’s obituary and a review of his contributions. — Joe

Use Trump’s executive orders sourced on White House website with caution

In White House posts wrong versions of Trump’s orders on its website, USA Today reports that the texts of at least five Trump executive orders hosted on the White House website do not match the official text sent to the Federal Register. Quoting from the USA Today article, examples include:

► The controversial travel ban executive order suspended the Visa Interview Waiver Program and required the secretary of State to enforce a section of the Immigration and Naturalization Act requiring an in-person interview for everyone seeking a non-immigrant visa. But the White House version of the order referred to that provision as 8 U.S.C. 1222, which requires a physical and mental examination — not 8 U.S.C. 1202, which requires an interview.

► An executive order on ethical standards for administration appointees, as it appears on the White House website, refers to”section 207 of title 28″ of the U.S. Code. As the nonprofit news site Pro Publica reported last week, that section does not exist. The Federal Register correctly cited section 207 of title 18, which does exist.

— Joe

Elsevier acquires Social Science Research Network

SSRN, the social science and humanities repository, has been acquired by Elsevier. Elsevier plans to leverage its Mendeley technology to enhance SSRN’s repository and online community. Mandeley is a free reference manager and academic social network Elsevier acquired a couple of years ago. Here’s the press release. — Joe

AALL announces new product award

Congratulations to Ravel Law for winning AALL’s New Product Award for its legal analytics service. Ravel FAQ here. — Joe

Candidates for AALL Executive Board announced

And here they are:

Vice President/President-Elect

Kathleen (Katie) Brown
Associate Dean for Library Services
Charlotte School of Law

Femi Cadmus
Edward Cornell Law Librarian &
Associate Dean for Library Services
Cornell University Law Library

Secretary

Luis Acosta
Law Library of Congress
Chief, Foreign, Comparative, and International Law Division II

Scott D. Bailey
Global Director of Research Services
Squire Patton Boggs LLP

Board Members (pick two)
 
Beth Adelman
Director of the Law Library &
Vice Dean for Legal Information Services
The University at Buffalo
State University of New York

Katherine M. Lowry, JD
Director of Practice Services
Baker Hostetler LLP

Catherine M. Monte
Chief Knowledge Officer
Fox Rothschild LLP

Jean P. O’Grady
Director of Research & Knowledge Services
DLA Piper

The election will be held September 30 to October 31, and successful candidates will begin their terms of office in July 2017. — Joe

DocuTicker Shuts Down

DocuTicker, the resource for grey literature published by government agencies, think tanks, etc., announced that it stopped publishing in 2016. Since its launch in June 2004, the site has posted 35,754 items. DocuTricker observed that there are many other web resources that perform the same grey literature service.

HT to Information Today. — Joe

Rosenthal for Congress: Fastcase co-founder seeking New York’s 10th Congressional District seat

Bob Ambrogi has the story. Here is Phil Rosenthal’s campaign website. — Joe

RELX reports 7% increase in Lexis Legal & Professional’s profits

RELX, parent company of Lexis Legal & Professional, reported its annual earnings yesterday. Lexis L & P’s revenues for 2015 were £1,443m, compared to £1,396m in 2014, yielding a modest 1% increase in revenue. Operating profit for 2015 was £274m up 7% from £260m in 2014 and yielding an operating profit margin of 18.9%, up 40 basis points from 2014.

Using today’s pound sterling to US dollars conversion rate, the combined revenue of TR Legal and Lexis L & P for 2015 was $5.45 billion, with TR Legal capturing 62% of the market, leaving 38% to Lexis. Of course, we do not have Bloomberg Law’s financials because it is a privately held company so market share cannot be more accurately determined. — Joe

Justice Scalia

The fact that Justice Scalia passed away over the weekend from natural causes is, of course, all over the news.  There are any number of articles speculating on how nominating a successor would affect the coming presidential election; who are the potential nominees; how this changes the ideological make-up of the Court, and so one.  All are worthy questions for speculation.  I’d like to highlight what this event means for coming decisions.  The Court has had a certain stability despite the two appointments resulting in the confirmation of Justices Sotomayor and Kagan.  As a side note on that, check out the CNN story by David Axelrod where Justice Scalia quietly expressed a preference for Elena Kagan to replace Justice Souter.  He got his wish when Justice Stevens retired.

Court watchers were always interested in Justice Scalia’s questions in oral argument given the Court’s ideological split, mostly 4-4 with Justice Kennedy in the middle.  While he was identified as a conservative, he didn’t always side with a conservative point of view.  I remember that he was fairly protective of the Fourth Amendment (See U.S. v. Jones, 132 S. Ct. 945 (2012) as an example) when the trend in Federal Courts seemed to find plenty of exceptions in its prohibitions).  Justice Scalia’s questions were as much a clue to his influence on the resulting decision as it was a bit of theater.  He certainly seemed to enjoy the intellectual banter with those presenting arguments.  CNN has another article listing six cases the site highlights as more significant cases than others.  How the Court will handle these and other issues will send Court watchers back to re-analyze the arguments.

The cases that concerns me is the potential appeal of the Google Books case and the Apple antitrust case, both affirmed by the Second Circuit.  The Authors Guild has filed a petition for cert which is pending.  Apple has yet to file its petition but has indicated that it intends to do so.  Justice Scalia will not be a participant in the case whether the Court accepts the cases or hears them.  These cases may stand if the Court splits 4-4 on the issues.  If it makes any difference, Justice Scalia joined Justice Ginsburg’s dissent in the Kirtsaeng v. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. first sale doctrine case.

I have a minor personal story about Justice Scalia.  He came to DePaul several years ago and spoke to the faculty in our Rare Book Room.  Security was exceptionally tight.  I believe it was the first time ever I had to show multiple IDs just to get into the building.  I was sitting at the Reference Desk when the Justice was shuttled up to his engagement via the service elevator.  That was less than 100 feet from where I was sitting.  That is effectively the closest I will likely get to a member of the Court.  It was amusing to have security watch me while I answered the occasional reference question.

I have written pointed things about Justice Scalia in the past.  I’ll remember him as the Justice who rejected legislative history in all possible forms as a vehicle for interpreting statutes.  He did not join all of Justice Ginsburg’s dissent in Kirtsaeng.  He skipped every section that mentioned legislative history, even if appearing only in a footnote.  His attention to original intent had him questioning whether the King could hide a sentry in a coach as an analogy to whether the government could place a tracker on a defendant’s car in some circumstances.  That’s from the Jones case mentioned above.

Goodbye Justice Scalia.  You were larger than life on the Court.  While you will be replaced, there will never be a Justice exactly like you.

Mark